Returning to Mossflower Country: An Essay

By Michelle Anya Anjirbag “Winter had muted the earth…” I remember reading those five opening words for the first time when I was about eight or nine years old in the Town Campus gymnasium while at a youth program trip during one of the school holidays. The sound of sneakers squeaking across basketball courts faded. I finished more than half of the book that day… Continue reading Returning to Mossflower Country: An Essay

Reading First and Second Person Narrative; or, The Necessity of Failure

  I find few things more mentally perplexing to read or write than flash fiction. Good fiction should transport the reader into a perspective completely outside his own and challenge the reader both mentally and emotionally. Good flash fiction needs to be a complete, compact package, capable of standing on its own for a short span of pages while simultaneously providing the emotional impact of … Continue reading Reading First and Second Person Narrative; or, The Necessity of Failure

Lost in (un) Translation/ Perdido na (falta de) Tradução

When I mention Portuguese, most people tend to think only of Brazil and Portugal, but the Lusophone world actually encompasses a number of other countries steeped in their own equally fascinating histories and cultures. Though people seem to underestimate Portuguese, often even confusing it with dialects of Spanish, it is a hugely important language spanning ten nations and four continents and with some 220 million … Continue reading Lost in (un) Translation/ Perdido na (falta de) Tradução

Remembering Cedric Diggory; or, the choice between right and easy

“Remember Cedric. Remember, if the time should come when you have to make a choice between what is right and what is easy, remember what happened to a boy who was good, and kind, and brave, because he strayed across the path of Lord Voldemort. Remember Cedric Diggory” – Dumbledore, Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire by J.K. Rowling I recently finished Harry Potter … Continue reading Remembering Cedric Diggory; or, the choice between right and easy

(YA)weh or the Highway: Riding the Young Adult Bandwagon

The jungle of young adult (YA) fiction is a strange but well-mapped place. At once a genre composed largely of overly dramatic teenage angst and epic, unrealistic romance, and a literary space that caters to a specific age group by treating its teenage protagonists like adults capable of making grownup decisions. Young adult fiction is subject to as much derision and scorn as it is to praise and … Continue reading (YA)weh or the Highway: Riding the Young Adult Bandwagon